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FRANCIACORTA

14/12/2018

 

The sparkling wine born just over 50 years ago on the hillside around Lake Iseo (Brescia) is the result of the project by a group of 11 pioneers, who – in the postwar period – began experimenting wine production using the champagne-making technique.

The name derives from Franzacurta, a toponym mentioned in 1277, referring to the monasteries founded by the Cluniac order, which were exempt (in Latin, francae) from payment of the tithe owed to the bishop on goods being delivered to the city of Brescia.

Franciacorta is obtained by means of bottle refermentation and disgorging techniques. Its base is Chardonnay and/or Pinot Nero grapes. It may contain small percentages of Pinot Bianco and Erbamat, an ancient indigenous vine from the Brescia area. The ageing on lees lasts 18 to 60 months, depending on the version.

In 1967 the Franciacorta was awarded the designation of controlled origin (DOC), and its first production guidelines were issued. Only 9 winemakers sold it, in just a few thousand bottles.

In 1995 it earned the designation of controlled origin (DOCG), namely the highest level of safeguard possible.

Today, thanks to 2,800 hectares (about 6,920 acres) of vineyards in 18 townships, 17 million bottles of Franciacorta are produced in the Satèn, Rosé, Millesimato, and Riserva versions.
According to Tom Stevenson, author of the World Encyclopedia of Champagne and Sparkling Wine, “The right place for Franciacorta is a high-end restaurant. Its quality is surprising”.

Market

THE MICHELIN-STARRED RESTAURANT BUSINESS IN ITALY

26/10/2018

 

In 2018 Massimo Bottura and his Osteria Francescana claimed first place in The World’s 50 Best Restaurants ranking. The restaurant in Modena is one of 8 Italian restaurants boasting the three Michelin stars. 41 Italian restaurants earned two stars, and 306 earned one.
But what is the benefit of being awarded by the French guide in terms of turnover?
According to research by JFC, in 2017 the total turnover for Italian starred restaurants was about 400 million euros, with a 10.3% increase compared to 2016.
JFC has calculated that in 2017 Italian restaurants awarded by the Michelin guide have hosted a total of 6,318 customers, with an almost equal portion of Italians (52.6%) and foreigners (47.4%), and generating 2,770 annual room bookings in the surrounding areas. At a 1-Michelin star restaurant, a full-course meal costs at least 112 euros; at a 2-star restaurant the bill rises to 178 euros, while at a 3-star restaurant your budget will be 250 euros.

On average, being a 1-Michelin star restaurant in Italy generates a turnover of about 708,200 euros per year (with a 53.2% increase in earnings compared to before being awarded the star), whilst a 2-Michelin star restaurant earns 1.12 million euros (18.7% more than before achieving the second star), and a 3-Michelin star restaurant earns 1.54 million (+25.6% turnover in the shift from 2 to 3 stars). Of course one must subtract the considerable costs of a starred restaurant from such turnover sums: 17 employees on average absorb about 32.6% of the turnover; raw material erodes an additional 32%; rent and management costs absorb about 24%.

Market

THE ORGANIC PRODUCT MARKET IN ITALY

26/09/2018

 

In 2017 the value of organic Made in Italy production was equal to 5.6 billion euros. Italy is the top European country in terms of export, and second in the world after the United States. Export of organic products generated 2 billion euros, equal to 5% of Italian agri-food export.

What is an organic product?

A product certified according to EU criteria in terms of land treatment, respect for the environment and ecosystem, and prohibition to use chemical, synthetic, or GMO products.

How do you recognize an organic product?

It will bear the EU organic farming logo: a green flag of Europe with white stars displayed as a leaf.

Who certifies organic products?

Specialized companies whose ID code is written on the package beside the EU organic farming logo.

How many farms in Italy are EU organic farming-certified?

64,210 farms, with 1.8 million hectares (about 4.5 million acres) of farmed land certified as at the end of 2016: 14.5% of the entire farmed land in Italy. Businesses and surface area grew by 15% in 2017.

How many people work in the organic product business in Italy?

According to an estimate by Assobio – an organization of organic and natural product processing and supply companies – the sector employs about 250,000 farmers, technical specialists, and certifiers involved in processing and supply. 22% of such workers are between 20 and 39 years old. Women manage 30% of the businesses.

Who uses organic products?

According to Nielsen data, 20% of Millennials (born between 1980 and 2000) purchases exclusively organic products, whilst 48% are occasional, but not exclusive, consumers. 45% of Baby Boomers (born between 1945 and 1964) are common purchasers of organic products, while the percentage is slightly higher – 46% – among members of Generation X (born between 1960 and 1980).
Again according to Nielsen data 56% of those who have children under 12 years of age, 53% of those with university degrees, and 58% of those with a high monthly wage are habitual consumers of organic products.

Market

MILAN, FOOD CAPITAL

11/07/2018

 

Despite some initial scepticism – especially among Italy’s mass media – Expo Milano 2015 proved to be a great success. A success according to the public, which was both numerous and greatly participative. Successful in its choice of theme: ‘Feed the Planet, Energy for Life’, a topical theme of widespread interest. And finally, success guaranteed by the quality of the organisation, which turned out better than that of previous decades. But besides all this – three years on, what is left of the Expo 2015 Milan legacy?

Not just fashion and design, today Milan is more than ever the international capital of food. For countless reasons. We list a few of them below.

 

Thanks to an architectural make-over of entire districts of the city, a number of new restaurants were launched. According to the Chamber of Commerce, after Expo the number of restaurants in the Milan-Monza-Lodi district increased by 1,482, bringing the overall number of eateries in the area to over 22,000, representing a turnover of 2.6 billion, equal to 14.7% of Italy overall.

Every year in May the city hosts Milano Food City, a week of events, talks and tastings dedicated to food and Seeds and Chips, the international food innovation summit.

Milan is the best-known and most popular branch of the Italian haute cuisine convention, Identità Golose, and is also home to TuttoFood, an unmissable date for employees and workers.

With its 24 Michelin stars, Milan is Italy’s most starred city for 2018. Michelin-addicts can choose between four two-star restaurants and 16 one-star restaurants.

Milan is home to Gualtiero Marchesi’s Academy of Cuisine; the institution was named after a legendary chef.

• You can sample dishes from all over the world in Milan: Chinese, Japanese, Mexican and Indian, but also Russian, Greek, Northern European and South American.

After Expo, food delivery services multiplied greatly Foodora, Just Eat, Uber Eats, Bacchetteforchette and Deliveroo), delivering all kinds of dishes to anywhere in the city.

The new metropolitan markets often rise from the ashes of the old ones: born over the past few years today they are an obligatory stop for citizens and tourists, selling food where you can eat as you buy.

Milan’s food trucks have evolved into a gourmet version: with a wide range on offer which is surprisingly similar to haute cuisine.

 

Today there is no doubt that the gourmet food and wine sector is one of Milan’s boasting points – in 2017 the city played host to nine million tourists, 10.3% more than the previous year. By tourist numbers alone, over the past few years Milan – the 14th most visited city in the world – has regularly ranked higher than Rome, a capital city of inestimable cultural, artistic and historical legacy.

Market

THE YEAR 2017 FOR ITALIAN WINE

06/06/2018

 

Italian wine in numbers
In 2017, Italy exported a total of 1,644 million Euros worth of wine, an increase of 1.44%. It has to be said that the French cashed in a bit more (1,649 million), but we beat them by quantity: Italy exports 3.3 million hectolitres while the French merely reach a total of 1.6 million, putting them behind Australia (1.9 million). In the first two months of 2018, Italy roared ahead in value: 243 million Euro ended up in the country’s coffers, while the French had to make do with 227 million. Why? Mainly thanks to Prosecco.

The rising success of the bubbles
The growing success of Italian wines is largely due to its bubbles, at least if we consider Nomisma’s “Wine Monitor” research which, in 2017, marked a very impressive trend in sparkling wines. Just think that Italy contributes 23% of the world’s export in sparkling wines, a percentage that just ten years ago was less than half (10%). The explosion of bubbles is thanks to the Prosecco phenomenon which, over the last five years, has grown by 117.5%. In fact, Prosecco has paved the way for all Italian bubbles, showing the more mature markets such as the USA and the UK that there is more to this product that champagne, and that you can enjoy a good sparkly without spending an arm and a leg.
But as well as sparkling wines, the entire white wine industry has grown and conquered: in fact, according to the Wine Monitor, Italy is the world leader in the export of white wines, beating the French, Spanish and the Australians. Italian biodiversity is paying off: the most important global markets have tired of sipping Chardonnay and Sauvignon, variety is the spice of life and interest has been sparked for the lands behind a successful wine. Something that seemed almost impossible a few years ago when the Australians, New Zealanders and South Africans were seen as the future conquerors of the white wine market.

The main players of the market
At the turning point of 2017, the list of Italian wine-producers gained two positions with a turnover of more than 100 million Euro. Two leading brands entered the prestigious Over 100 Club with an above average growth: the Mondodelvino Group, a young business based in Forlì which ranked 17th with a turnover of 106.84 million and Ruffino, the Italian branch of the American company Constellation Brands which entered number 18 with a turnover of 106.83 million Euro. Bringing the market’s “big brands” to a total of 19, two more than the year before and five more compared to 2015.

 

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Together, these 19 big players represent a turnover of more than 3.3 billion Euro, with exports exceeding 2.3 billion and a production of more than 1.2 billion bottles.

Market, News

ANUGA PROVES ITSELF TO BE THE LEADING FOOD & BEVERAGE TRADE FAIR

15/11/2017

 

The 34th edition of Anuga, the leading international food & beverage fair held in Cologne from 7-11 October 2017, has ended with record attendance figures. The event attracted approximately 165,000 operators from 198 countries, 75% of which were foreign. There was a record number of exhibitors as well: 7,405 in total, of which 716 were German and 6,689 were from abroad, distributed over a surface area of 284,000 square metres.
‘Anuga is the world’s biggest and most important business platform for the international food industry,’ said Gerald Böse, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Cologne Koelnmesse exhibition centre after the event had drawn to a close. ‘The trade fair brings the global supply and demand together very precisely. With its clear concept and focus on relevant themes, it is a reliable marketplace for the global food world.’

The 2017 edition was the seventh time Alifood, a leading trader of premium Italian food products, has attended Anuga. The final outcome was extremely positive: interest in Italian food and beverages continues to grow and, as a result, so does the importance of organisations like Alifood that can manage the entire supply chain of each and every product, from production to delivery, finding solutions to its customers’ problems with customs duty, hygiene and more general issues to do with local regulations.
The latest edition of Anuga has proved to be a showcase, allowing Alifood to present new products to its long-standing partners, and has also provided an opportunity to secure new strategic alliances with operators from Korea, Chile, Japan, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia and Ukraine.

The next edition of Anuga will take place in Cologne from 5-9 October 2019.

Market

THE 2017 GRAPE HARVEST IN ITALY

23/10/2017

 

Production down 25%
When it comes to the weather, 2017 was a strange year: the spring frosts were followed by a hot summer and drought. The sudden changes in climate hit Italian vineyards and the resulting harvests very hard. According to Assoenologi (the Italian association of oenologists and oenological technicians), the 2017 harvest was the earliest of the last decade due to the stress placed on vineyards, approximately ten days earlier than usual and one of the poorest in terms of quantity since 1947, with a 25% drop in the production of wine and must. It is estimated that total production was 41 million hectolitres. More specifically, the statistics point to a 40% drop in the harvest in the Lazio region, a 30% drop in Tuscany and Puglia, a 25% drop in Lombardy, a 15% reduction in the Veneto and Friuli regions and a 10% drop in the autonomous region of Trentino Alto Adige. Alongside such a string of negative figures, the only region that increased production was Campania, which bucked the trend with a 5% bigger harvest. According to Coldiretti (the Italian farmers’ association), the yield also went down, i.e. the amount of juice produced by each bunch of grapes. While in the past, each kilo of harvested grapes produced around 0.77 litres of wine, this year’s yield was less than that.

Quality, not quantity
While this year will come to a close with reduced quantities, experts believe that quality will, on the contrary, be better. The lack of water forced vine roots to dig deeper into the soil, an important factor affecting the end product’s quality. When vines do this, they extract the best characteristics from each terroir of origin, reaching the peak of perfection.

Rising prices
According to Assoenologi, DOC and IGT certified wines could become between 10-20% more expensive, increases that will also affect ordinary undesignated wines. A considerable price hike is expected for Franciacorta sparkling wine from Lombardy, which lost almost 50% of the grapes produced compared to last year, due to frost. A bargained increase is also underway for Ribolla Gialla and Sauvignon produced in the Friuli Venezia Giulia region. In Tuscany, Merlot and Sangiovese grapes were particularly hard hit, so one can easily imagine higher prices for famous DOC red wines such as Chianti and Brunello di Montalcino. The 40% reduction recorded in the Lazio region is ominous for the price of wines from the Castelli Romani area. In Emilia Romagna, higher prices are expected for Malvasia and Grechetto. In the south, we can expect price hikes for Sicilian Zibibbo and Sardinian Vermentino, among others. In contrast, the prices of wines produced in Piedmont and Veneto have remained stable.

Market

VINITALY PRESENTS ITALY TO DRINK

14/04/2017

 

The 51st edition of the international wine fair, Vinitaly, was held in Verona – home of Romeo and Juliet and the Arena – from the 9th to the 12th of April 2017.

First held in 1967, under the name “Le giornate del vino”, the event has marked the evolution of the Italian wine system, and now contends the title of best international wine fair with Prowein (Dusseldorf, Germany) and Vinexpo (Bordeaux, France).

During Vinitaly, Verona also hosted Sol & Agrifood, the international show of fine agri-food, and Enolitech, the international show of wine growing and winemaking techniques and olive growing and oil-making technologies.

VINITALY 2017 IN NUMBERS

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Market

4 Trends to Watch Out for This Year

31/03/2017
new market opportunity

According to a recent study published on alleywatch.com, there are some predictions you should pay attention to if you’re in the food industry.

We’ve taken the time to summarize the study and identify 4 of the food trends that will important this year: Continue Reading…

Market

Dubai wants high quality Italian food

14/02/2017
italian-food in dubai and middle east

Growth in the tourism industry has resulted in a growing number of new hotels and resorts in the UAE which in turn has created the growing demand of imported food. Additionally, it’s a country that is characterized by the fact that it’s in the dessert, therefore, it must import over 90% of its food. Continue Reading…

Market

Italian food and wine have found new frontiers in Singapore

07/02/2017
italian food in singapore

Italian SMEs in the food & wine industry will be knocking on Asia’s door today at a fair in Singapore, where some sixty businesses will be meeting buyers, distributors and restaurateurs from Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Hong Kong, China and Australia, against the futuristic backdrop of Suntec City. Continue Reading…